Crickets as food

May 14, 2017

“In just a few years, there will be 9 billion people on the Earth. All those mouths will demand food – and especially animal protein. But the current waste produced by mass farming of beef, pork, chicken and other meats may prove unsustainable for a teeming, hungry human population.  The solution could be bugs, many have argued. They have more nutritional “bang for the buck” – and they could help feed the growing masses, some food experts say.”

In a related note, the local paper today carried an article about the pending retirement of Dr. Tom Turpin, one of the best proponents of bugs (as food and otherwise).  God speed, Tom and enjoy your retirement!

Dr. D.

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A short history of umami

May 14, 2017

An interesting piece about how umami was discovered and then ignored in the West for a century

Dr. D.


Why do we cook so many things at 350F?

May 10, 2017

Well, there are numerous reasons but one of the more important ones is the Maillard reaction and its tasty and yummy smelling products….

Dr. D.


Cooking the perfect steak

May 10, 2017

Good advice, whether you’ve selected a tough or tender cut steak….here’s how to do it….

Dr. D.


Consumer perception and food choice science

May 5, 2017

“People across the globe care about what goes in their food and on their tables, but even the most diligent consumer admitted they don’t really know the meaning of many food labels, the differences in farming methods like organic and conventional and the environmental impact.”

Dr. D.


Do genes influence what we like to eat?

April 27, 2017

Probably.  This is a quite intriguing result reported at the most recent Experimental Biology meetings in Chicago. 

“For (this) study, the researchers analyzed the genetics of 818 men and women of European ancestry and gathered information about their diet using a questionnaire. The researchers found that the genes they studied did play a significant role in a person’s food choices and dietary habits. For example, higher chocolate intake and a larger waist size was associated with certain forms of the oxytocin receptor gene, and an obesity-associated gene played a role in vegetable and fiber intake. They also observed that certain genes were involved in salt and fat intake.”

Dr. D.


Post harvest changes in anti-cancer nutrients

April 27, 2017

Not all changes in all plant materials are bad….the anti-cancer nutrients in the salad vegetable rocket (isothiochanates such as sulforaphane) actually increase post harvest

Dr. D.