It’s almost like our bodies don’t want us to lose weight…

February 9, 2018

“According to a new study, the levels of hormones that control hunger and fullness (satiety) both rise after weight loss, but individuals may only experience an increase in hunger. After one month of following the program, the volunteers’ subjective sense of fullness after a meal was unchanged, but decreased at the one- and two-year marks, whereas self-reported hunger increased significantly after one and two years. The research team found increases in the levels of both the hunger and satiety hormones after one and two years of sustained weight loss. However, the boost in hunger hormones seemed to override the increase in satiety hormones.”

Dr. D.

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Your mood depends on the food you eat

February 5, 2018

I think no one would find this surprising.  What might be surprising is the difference in the effect between different age groups.  These researchers found that mood in young adults (18-29) seems to be dependent on food that increases availability of neurotransmitter precursors and concentrations in the brain (meat).

However, mood in mature adults (over 30 years) may be more reliant on food that increases availability of antioxidants (fruits) and abstinence of food that inappropriately activates the sympathetic nervous system (coffee, high glycemic index and skipping breakfast).

Dr. D.


Reading out loud to yourself helps you remember

February 5, 2018

Next time you are studying for an exam and you don’t have a friend to study with, remember this trick….

Dr. D.


Beer on Mars

November 29, 2017

Here’s some research we can all get behind….beer on Mars.

Dr. D.


Garlic and chronic infections

November 29, 2017

So garlic is not only good for protection against vampires….  Researchers from the University of Copenhagen use a compound from garlic to destroy biofilm of resistant bacteria and make antibiotics work again. The study shows that the compound inhibits small regulatory RNA molecules.

Dr. D.


The potential effect of food prices on mortality

November 29, 2017

An interesting study about the effect of food prices on mortality.  A team of researchers used a comparative risk assessment model to estimate the potential effects of price subsidies on healthy foods, such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and nuts and seeds, and taxes on processed and unprocessed red meats and sugary drinks, on the number of annual deaths from cardiometabolic diseases in the United States.  The researchers found that if the prices of all seven dietary items were altered 10 percent each, an estimated 23,000 deaths per year could be prevented; this corresponds to 3.4 percent of all cardiometabolic disease deaths in the United States. A 30 percent price change almost tripled that approximation with an estimation of 63,000 deaths prevented per year, or 9.2 percent of all cardiometabolic disease deaths.

Dr. D.


Tomatoes and skin cancer

August 14, 2017

It’s summer…we have lots of sun and lots of tomatoes….so go ahead and eat all you want….

Dr. D.