Do genes influence what we like to eat?

April 27, 2017

Probably.  This is a quite intriguing result reported at the most recent Experimental Biology meetings in Chicago. 

“For (this) study, the researchers analyzed the genetics of 818 men and women of European ancestry and gathered information about their diet using a questionnaire. The researchers found that the genes they studied did play a significant role in a person’s food choices and dietary habits. For example, higher chocolate intake and a larger waist size was associated with certain forms of the oxytocin receptor gene, and an obesity-associated gene played a role in vegetable and fiber intake. They also observed that certain genes were involved in salt and fat intake.”

Dr. D.


Post harvest changes in anti-cancer nutrients

April 27, 2017

Not all changes in all plant materials are bad….the anti-cancer nutrients in the salad vegetable rocket (isothiochanates such as sulforaphane) actually increase post harvest

Dr. D.


What’s the best way to crack an egg?

April 27, 2017

As usual science, physics in this case, has the answer….which I learned by much trial and error….

Dr. D.


Plant lectins and inflammation

April 27, 2017

This is an intriguing article if only for the fact that one conclusion is that we should all be eating less fruits and vegetables….if this sounds weird to you, read on….

Dr. D.


Green tea is effective at preventing cognitive decline

April 10, 2017

A cup of tea a day can keep dementia away, and this is especially so for those who are genetically predisposed to the debilitating disease.  The longitudinal study involving 957 Chinese seniors aged 55 years or older has found that regular consumption of tea lowers the risk of cognitive decline in the elderly by 50 percent, while APOE e4 gene carriers who are genetically at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease may experience a reduction in cognitive impairment risk by as much as 86 percent.”

Dr. D.


Should you eat before or after exercising?

April 10, 2017

“After eating, adipose tissue “is busy responding to the meal and a bout of exercise at this time will not stimulate the same [beneficial] changes in adipose tissue. This means that exercise in a fasted state might provoke more favorable changes in adipose tissue, and this could be beneficial for health in the long term”.”  So make that McDonalds run after hitting the gym…

Dr. D.


Is it sugar or fat that is killing you?

April 4, 2017

A nice review for the layman from The New Yorker….and, no, it does not answer the question posed in the title…

Dr. D.